1/2 a snugglebug

everything cozy

110 notes

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

A Vintage Van Delivers Vintage (and New) Literature

You’re probably well-acquainted with the idea of the food van. The more sartorially minded may have even visited a fashion truck. Now, it’s translated into literature aimed at tourists.
In June 2013, three entrepreneurial literature lovers from Portugal’s capital created a nomadic bookstore that moves around the city all year long, bringing Portuguese literature to international visitors.
Tell a Story — that’s the van’s name — offers a collection of more than a dozen Portuguese classics that have been translated into English, French, Italian, German and Spanish. There’s something for everyone, from the evasive and sad verses of Fernando Pessoa — “To be understood is to prostitute oneself” — to Antonio Lobo Antunes’ dense and moving accounts of the country’s post-colonial legacy.


The vehicle, a gorgeous 1975 Renault Estafette, has character, but the soul of this literary omnibus is its driver, Francisco Antolin. He’s a 36-year-old Lisboner who loves books and talking about them with whoever stops by.
“We wanted to help people discover Portugal through our literature, because stories are a great way to understand a culture,” he says.
Read more: Portugal’s Nomadic Bookstore | Good Sh*t | OZY 

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

A Vintage Van Delivers Vintage (and New) Literature

You’re probably well-acquainted with the idea of the food van. The more sartorially minded may have even visited a fashion truck. Now, it’s translated into literature aimed at tourists.

In June 2013, three entrepreneurial literature lovers from Portugal’s capital created a nomadic bookstore that moves around the city all year long, bringing Portuguese literature to international visitors.

Tell a Story — that’s the van’s name — offers a collection of more than a dozen Portuguese classics that have been translated into English, French, Italian, German and Spanish. There’s something for everyone, from the evasive and sad verses of Fernando Pessoa — “To be understood is to prostitute oneself” — to Antonio Lobo Antunes’ dense and moving accounts of the country’s post-colonial legacy.

The vehicle, a gorgeous 1975 Renault Estafette, has character, but the soul of this literary omnibus is its driver, Francisco Antolin. He’s a 36-year-old Lisboner who loves books and talking about them with whoever stops by.

“We wanted to help people discover Portugal through our literature, because stories are a great way to understand a culture,” he says.



Read more: Portugal’s Nomadic Bookstore | Good Sh*t | OZY 

6,972 notes

humansofnewyork:

This may be the happiest I’ve ever been to write a post. Last year, as many of you probably remember, we held a crowdfunding campaign to help a family with adoption fees. The Watkins family had already adopted an eight year old daughter from Ethiopia. They were so happy with their new family, they decided to adopt a ten year old boy named Rabuma, who they had discovered in an orphanage. They knew that Rabuma was destined to be their new son, but were heartbroken because they didn’t have the money to bring him home yet. 4,000 of you donated to help make this family a reality. Over the past year, the Watkins have been sending me periodic updates, but I didn’t want to share them because I didn’t want to jeopardize the process. But everything just finalized. By a beautiful coincidence, the Watkins happened to pick up Rabuma while I was in Africa. So between destinations, I took a two hour detour to Ethiopia to photograph the occasion. It was such an honor for me to be present at the birth of this new family. The love that had already developed between them just filled the room.

humansofnewyork:

This may be the happiest I’ve ever been to write a post. Last year, as many of you probably remember, we held a crowdfunding campaign to help a family with adoption fees. The Watkins family had already adopted an eight year old daughter from Ethiopia. They were so happy with their new family, they decided to adopt a ten year old boy named Rabuma, who they had discovered in an orphanage. They knew that Rabuma was destined to be their new son, but were heartbroken because they didn’t have the money to bring him home yet. 4,000 of you donated to help make this family a reality. Over the past year, the Watkins have been sending me periodic updates, but I didn’t want to share them because I didn’t want to jeopardize the process. But everything just finalized. By a beautiful coincidence, the Watkins happened to pick up Rabuma while I was in Africa. So between destinations, I took a two hour detour to Ethiopia to photograph the occasion. It was such an honor for me to be present at the birth of this new family. The love that had already developed between them just filled the room.

3,653 notes

humansofnewyork:

"Her father and brother died in the same month. She developed a very bad problem in her head after that. For months, she would barely move. I was so worried about her that I took her to hospitals, and nothing worked. It was the hardest time of my life. But now she is better. She’s the greatest wife. Every time I come home, she makes me tea and thanks me for working all day.""How did she fix her sadness?""None of the hospitals could help. But we just kept praying together."
(Naivasha, Kenya)

humansofnewyork:

"Her father and brother died in the same month. She developed a very bad problem in her head after that. For months, she would barely move. I was so worried about her that I took her to hospitals, and nothing worked. It was the hardest time of my life. But now she is better. She’s the greatest wife. Every time I come home, she makes me tea and thanks me for working all day."
"How did she fix her sadness?"
"None of the hospitals could help. But we just kept praying together."

(Naivasha, Kenya)